Mizuno irons have long been revered for their pure-feeling, high-performing qualities. Considered by many to be among the best irons in the industry, Mizuno clubs are finding their way into the hands of more Tour pros and amateurs alike these days.

And for good reason…they help golfers get the job done. Just ask Brooks Koepka, who won multiple majors with Mizuno irons. And let’s not forget…he played Mizuno by choice, NOT by contract. And that says a lot.

This year, Mizuno has launched a trio of new irons, the MP-20 line, as well as a new line of wedges, the T20. Last month, I eagerly put these new weapons into play for a test-drive. And (as expected) they ticked every box.

I should note that you can (and perhaps should) look at these irons not just as full sets, but, rather, consider mixing them up to potentially build a mixed-bag (a “Blended set”) of irons. Mizuno’s recommended breakpoints for blended sets are between 4/5-iron or 7/8-iron, so you can, for example, mix a set of forgiving long irons, with high-performing short irons. (But chat with your clubfitter first to see their recommendations).

Mizuno MP 20

First up was the MP-20 Muscleback, a sleek, sexy-looking blade with crisp, clean lines that hearkens back to the “good old days” reminiscent of the most cherished blades of Mizuno’s past. In short, this iron is simply beautiful to look at.

At address, you’ll notice a very thin topline (a look favoured by tour pros). It’s the thinnest topline Mizuno has produced in quite a while. The mixed satin/mirror finish also reduces glare, allowing you to focus solely on your ball.

Under the hood, the MP-20 is Grain Flow Forged from 1025E Pure Select Mild Carbon Steel, then layered with soft copper plating beneath a Nickel Chrome finish. This high-tech wizardry is designed to promote Mizuno’s amazingly-soft feel, while also giving you plenty of feedback at impact. A tapered top blade and cambered sole, meanwhile, offers forgiveness on strikes high or low on the face.

Experienced players and low markers will simply LOVE these irons. Mizuno’s tagline of “Nothing feels like a Mizuno” certainly rings true with these irons, as they feel buttery-smooth on contact. And the control is out of this world; from high fades to strong draws to centre-punches and more, you can play all the shots with these irons, and they will reward you handsomely. Definitely check them out! RRP $269. Available in 3-PW, (Right-Handed).

MP20 MMC

Next up was the MP-20 MMC. MMC stands for multi-material construction, and it essentially takes the chassis and proportions of the MP-20 Muscleback, and adds a Titanium muscle plate and a 12g Tungsten sole weight in the 4-7 iron. This allows for an easier launch off the face, while promoting more forgiveness from off-centre strikes. And it maintains the muscleback feel.

Suitable for the majority of players, the MMC is a real workhorse of an iron. Taking all of the high-performance qualities of the muscleback, and adding a bunch of forgiveness, makes this a solid and exciting iron. As an 11-handicapper, I found these to be the pick for my own game, as my off-centre strikes can far outnumber my pure ones. But the beauty of the MMC is that even the off-centre shots still performed extremely well, and gave all the feedback and feel that I needed. These were a joy to play, and I highly recommend them. RRP $289. 4-PW, (Right-Handed only).

MP-20 HMB

Rounding out the trio, I tested the MP-20 HMB. These performance hybrid irons take the idea of the popular “long iron replacements” and extend the concept through to the wedge.  These irons utilise Mizuno’s Chromoly face and neck, a forged stainless steel body and Tungsten weighting, and are layered with soft copper plating and protective Nickel Chrome. Like the MP-20 Muscleback, the HMB features a thin topline and offset transition, but adds a more generous sole.

Like the MMC, these irons are suited for a variety of players – from consistent ball players looking for added ball speed (without sacrificing control), to the higher handicappers seeking a bit more forgiveness and consistency, with an easier launch. They are also a great addition to a “Blended set”, as mentioned above. (The 9/PW feature 1025e Pure Select Mild Carbon Steel, a softer steel, making them even more responsive). RRP $289. 2-PW (Right-Handed).

Note: Mizuno also offers the MP-20 SEL, a special-edition leftie mixed-set of the precise, shotmaking MP-20 muscle-back mid to short irons, with stable, easy-launching MP-20 HMB long irons. Lofts adjusted for perfect distance gaps throughout.

Finally, I was excited to test the Mizuno T20 Wedges. While Mizuno irons are known for their consistency and feel, this reputation is no more evident than in the clubs where it matters the most: wedges. And with the new T20 Wedges, feel and consistency are so good, they’re off the charts. And this is all down to the grooves: the higher-lofted wedges feature a wider, shallower groove (for the 3/4 and half-shots played around the green), while the lower-lofted options have deeper, narrower groove which helps deliver spin and control on the full shots.  Mizuno has also added vertically-etched “Hydroflow Micro Grooves”, which help improve/maintain spin in damp conditions.

Shot after shot, I was amazed at how well these wedges performed. In truth, there were some shots early in the round where I got far more spin than I was expecting, which was a pleasant surprise (generating some raised eyebrows, and envy, from my playing partners). As with all the Mizuno irons I tested, “Feel” was the overarching theme, and I felt incredibly sad to say goodbye to these wedges following my round. They will be missed.

T20 Wedges are available from 44-degree to 62-degree, in three finishes: Satin Chrome & Blue ION, or Raw. STD BEVEL, Subtle M Grind and Aggressive C Grind options available. RRP $269

https://golf.mizunoeurope.com/

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