Bobby Jones (courtesy of USGA)

THE US Masters is upon us and promises to be just as intriguing as when it was first played at Augusta National in 1934.

For many golf fans, the annual golf calendar doesn’t start until Masters week in April.

So, what is it about the Masters that intrigues the millions of golf fans around the world?

Is it the history, the pristine fairways that look as if they have been painted, the azaleas and majestic pines, the unpredictability or the secretive gentlemen-only membership?

Inside Golf has delved into the archives and come up with a comprehensive list of things you may or may not know about the Masters and its home – Augusta National.

1934

The first Masters Invitation was played with the nines in reverse. A year later the format was switched because of frost delay.

Horton Smith won the inaugural event with a 284 total – four-under par.

Bobby Jones, the club and tournament co-founder, makes his first appearance.

Ross Somerville records the first hole-in-one at the 16th.

1935

Gene Sarazen holes a 4-wood from 235 yards for an albatross 2 on the par-5 15th hole in the final round. Since then it’s been known as “The shot heard around the world”.

1937

Augusta National members first wear the green jacket so patrons could identify a reliable source of information.

1939

The tournament is officially named The Masters.

1940

Lloyd Mangrum scores course a course record 64 in opening round – a record which stands for 46 years.

 

1941

Craig Wood becomes the first wire-to-wire winner.

 

1942

Byron Nelson defeats Ben Hogan in the first Masters playoff.

 

1943-1945

The Masters is not played due to World War II.

 

1947

Jimmy Demaret becomes first golfer to break par in all four rounds.

 

1948

Dwight D. Eisenhower becomes a member at Augusta – four years before being elected president of the US.

1949

Winner Sam Snead is the first player to be awarded with a green jacket.

 

1950

Jimmy Demaret becomes the first three-time Masters champion.

1952

Ben Hogan starts the champions’ dinner.

 

1955

The first bridge at Augusta National named in honour of a player is dedicated to Gene Sarazen. The Sarazen Bridge crossed the hazard in front of the green on the 15th hole.

 

1956

Television coverage starts.

 

1957

For the first time, a 36-hole cut is introduced.

1958

“Amen Corner” – holes 11-13 – christened by writer Herbert Warren Wind.

Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson have bridges named after them. The Hogan Bridge crosses Rae’s Creek, which takes golfers to the 12 green and the Nelson Bridge crosses Rae’s Creek taking golfers to the 13 tee.

1959

Arthur (Art) Wall becomes the first champion to win with a birdie on the final hole.

 

1961

South African Gary Player becomes the first non-American champion.

1964

Arnold Palmer becomes the first four-time winner.

1965

Butler Cabin begins serving as television studio.

Gene Sarazen receives a harsh reprimand from Augusta co-founder Clifford Roberts for wearing his green jacket on a televised golf show.

 

1966

Jack Nicklaus becomes the first back-to-back champion.

1967

Television announcer Jack Whitaker is banned for referring to the patrons in the 1966 playoff as a “mob”.

 

1968

Bob Goalby wins when Roberto De Vicenzo signs an incorrect scorecard showing a 4 on the 17th instead of a birdie 3 to miss a playoff.

1971

Bobby Jones dies aged 69.

1975

Lee Elder becomes first African-American to play in the tournament.

 

1977

Clifford Roberts, Augusta National’s co-founder, is found dead on the course from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

 

1979

Colourful character Fuzzy Zoeller wins the first sudden-death playoff.

 

1980

Seve Ballesteros becomes first European champion.

1982

Craig Stadler defeats Dan Pohl in the tournament’s first one-hole playoff.

 

1983

For the first time, players are given the option of using their own caddies.

 

1986

Jack Nicklaus win his record sixth Masters at age 46.

Greg Norman and Nick Price both shoot tournament-record 63

1987

Larry Mize chips-in to beat Greg Norman in a sudden-death playoff.

 

1991

Ron Townsend becomes first African-American member admitted to the club.

 

1992

Mark Calcavecchia scores a record 29 on the back nine in the fourth round.

 

1995

Gary McCord is booted off TV coverage for saying the greens were so slick they looked as if they’d been “bikini waxed”.

Ben Crenshaw wins his second Masters.

 

1996

Greg Norman blows a six-shot 54-hole lead to hand Nick Flado the title.

1997

Tiger Woods becomes first African-American winner

 

1998

Mark O’Meara, at 41, becomes the oldest first-time winner.

2000

The Big Fijian Vijay Singh wins the green jacket.

 

2001

Toshi Izawa shoots 281 – the lowest score by a first-time contestant.

 

2003

Mike Weir becomes the first left-hander and first Canadian to win the Masters.

 

2004

Arnold Palmer plays in 50th consecutive and final Masters.

The golf course is lengthened to 7445 yards (6808m) – 502m longer than it was in 2001.

 

2007

American Zach Johnson ties the highest winning score of 289 – one-over –  with Sam Snead (1954) and Jack Burke (1956).

2008

Trevor Immelman becomes the second South African to win the Masters – 47 years after Gary Player won his first green jacket.

 

2009

Argentinean Angel Cabrera captures the title.

 

2010

Leftie Phil Mickelson wins his third green jacket in a seven-year stretch.

 

 

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